Tag Archive for: Disability

In contemporary society, the discourse surrounding disability and special needs has evolved significantly, yet outdated perceptions persist. The phrase “additional needs” emerges as a powerful tool to dismantle negative stereotypes and foster a more inclusive dialogue. It serves as a catalyst for transforming society’s understanding of what it means to live with a disability or special needs. This article explores the term “additional needs” and its potential to reshape societal perspectives.

Society has long grappled with outdated and prejudiced notions regarding disability and special needs. Negative stereotypes often stem from misinformation and lack of exposure to diverse experiences. Individuals with disabilities are frequently stigmatized and marginalized, facing barriers that hinder their full participation in various aspects of life. It is crucial to recognize the urgent need for a paradigm shift in societal attitudes towards those with additional needs.

Language plays a pivotal role in shaping societal perceptions. By using language that focuses on the idea of additional needs, we can highlight the commonality of human needs while acknowledging the unique requirements some individuals may have. This shift in language encourages empathy, understanding, and inclusivity.

The adoption of the phrase “additional needs” opens up new dialogues about inclusivity and diversity. It prompts conversations that challenge preconceived notions and fosters a more nuanced understanding of the varied experiences within the community of individuals with additional needs. These conversations pave the way for greater awareness and acceptance, fostering an environment where everyone is acknowledged for their inherent worth and potential.

Education is a powerful tool in dismantling stereotypes and promoting inclusivity. Society must be equipped with accurate and up-to-date information about disabilities and additional needs. By utilizing the term “additional needs,” we can initiate educational campaigns that focus on breaking down barriers and promoting a more empathetic and informed community. This education extends beyond academic institutions to workplaces, public spaces, and homes.

At its core, the concept of additional needs emphasizes the shared human experience of having needs, albeit with varying degrees and forms. By recognizing that we all have needs, society can move towards a more compassionate and supportive stance. This shift empowers individuals with additional needs to participate fully in all aspects of life, fostering a society where diversity is celebrated rather than stigmatized.

The phrase “additional needs” serves as a beacon of hope for transforming society’s perspective on disability and special needs. By challenging outdated perceptions and fostering inclusive dialogues, we can create a more empathetic and understanding community. Through education and a commitment to recognizing shared human needs, we can build a society that celebrates diversity and ensures that everyone, regardless of their unique requirements, can lead a fulfilling and meaningful life. It is time to embrace the power of language and shift towards a more inclusive future for all.

As a practitioner and as a parent of an additional needs child, my personal life experiences affect my professional and vice versa. One most enlightening effect of having my son, who was quite sensitive to certain noises or fearful of certain states was that I had to look for a solution to ease his system so that he could self-regulate. I learned intuitively and through practicing that I could balance my son using biofeedback to activate and balance his vagus nerve. What transpired was amazing. He was able not to just tolerate but still soothe and transition his focus back to what he was doing instead of focusing on barking dogs, for instance. Using this information I quickly started applying my knowledge on my clients. They calmed quicker. Anxiety reduced, digestion improved. Why, you ask? Because the vagus nerve is the 10th cranial nerve and it is our longest winding nerve affecting heart rate, breathing and because it wraps around most of the organs it therefore affects our digestion.

When we have a stress response, like my son to the sound of a dog barking, we choose to go into fight or flight or stress and digest depending on how “balanced”we feel. When we are more balanced and less stressed, it is easier to respond. However, when life circumstances that are out of our control happen, like #COVID-19, loss of a loved one, etc. stress ensues. This puts us back into fight and flight, making us more reactive. Even as adults, things that we could handle before re-trigger us along with new triggers and we become overly sensitive. This over-sensitivity expresses itself either as anxiety, depression, sleeplessness, allergic reactions, and or digestive issues.

Adults and children alike respond to having their vagus nerve stimulated and balanced. Working on the vagus nerve through biofeedback returns their bodies back into the rest and digest state. Adult clients and parents of children I have worked on have commented that they or their children have noticeably become less reactive, that they pause and respond where they would have reacted. Mood even elevates, becoming calmer even happier.

There are ways of easing yourself from stress. Biofeedback has helped our family and my clients do that.

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